How Theology Affects Generosity

Our lack of generosity stems from bad theology.

Think about it—

  • When you see people in need, do you hesitate or justify inaction?
  • When you become aware of a problem, do you look to blame government or institutions?
  • When you think of the millions who do not yet know Jesus, are you immune to calls for sharing your faith?

The more I discover the true God of Scripture, the more deeply I’m moved to not only care but to act.

John said, “How great is the love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are! The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him” (1 John 3:1, NIV). God has lavished love on us. He didn’t wait until we proved ourselves. He came while we were yet sinners (Romans 5:8). He didn’t come just to deliver a message. He came to lay down His life for us all (John 15:13). He didn’t just redeem our lives from the pit; He was raised from the dead to give us hope of restoration and new life (Romans 8:11). God didn’t look at us and hesitate, shift blame or be indifferent. God saw us and acted.

When we are captured by the extravagance of God’s love, our lives change. We begin to look so much like Jesus that “the reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him.” We are so closely identified with our loving Savior that our lives and churches become living illustrations of his extravagant grace.

If we don’t live with extravagant generosity, we should question our theology.

To live like Christ—

  • When we see people in need, we are moved with compassion and take action (Matthew 14:14).
  • When we become aware of a problem, we take responsibility to act upon that awareness (1 John 3:17).
  • When we think of the millions who do not yet know Jesus, we are moved and empowered by the Holy Spirit to testify (Acts 1:8).

A generous life is the outflow of a biblical understanding of the extravagant love we’ve received from our great God.

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